Tag: Inequality

Because ‘Richest Americans Do Not Need Another Massive Tax Cut,’ 776 Groups Urge Congress to Stop Tax Scam 2.0

The richest Americans do not need another massive tax cut; they and America's corporations need to start paying their fair share, so we have the resources needed to protect Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid and to invest in education, infrastructure and many more services working families and communities need to thrive," the progressive groups wrote. (Photo: Stop the GOP Tax Scam)

Working Class Middle America voted and wereconned into this. No cuts Abbott did the same in Australia. (ODT)

via Because ‘Richest Americans Do Not Need Another Massive Tax Cut,’ 776 Groups Urge Congress to Stop Tax Scam 2.0

Don’t believe what they say about inequality. Some of us are worse off

The income survey data show an even more mixed record. The Our World in Data database shows that by 2003 the real income of the median Australian household was only about 5% higher in real terms than in 1989, while the second and third decile households – mainly headed by those on low wages and some on social security – were actually no better-off than in 1989, largely due to the effects of the early 1990s recession.

Despite the way it’s been spun, the Commission’s main message is that in the decades ahead we will need both policies that generate economic growth and policies that ensure it’s well spread. One without the other could leave many of us worse off.

via Don’t believe what they say about inequality. Some of us are worse off

If equality can happen for marriage, it can happen for Indigenous people | IndigenousX | Opinion | The Guardian

Kyra Kum-Sing

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples still face key factors of inequality, such as: high incarceration rates, health issues, access to lands, high rates of children being taken away from their families and the need for self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders peoples.

via If equality can happen for marriage, it can happen for Indigenous people | IndigenousX | Opinion | The Guardian

Where white-collar crime meets a wet lettuce leaf

Brisbane Magistrates Court in Queensland.

“It really does require a sentence to be imposed that will provide adequate deterrence to ensure that investors, who these days often are retired people who have no other means of earning a livelihood except for their investments … are adequately protected,” McLennan told a gobsmacked court.

via Where white-collar crime meets a wet lettuce leaf

Day to Day Politics: Inequality. What’s mine is mine and what’s yours is negotiable. – » The Australian Independent Media Network

Thursday 3 August 2017 When the lady with the awful hairdo uttered these villainous words of inequity … ”There is no such thing as society. There are only individuals making there are only individuals making their way” (paraphrased) … and when the second-rate actor aligned his politics with the Christian Right, the scene was set for…

Source: Day to Day Politics: Inequality. What’s mine is mine and what’s yours is negotiable. – » The Australian Independent Media Network

Inequality increasing, says Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe

Inequality in wealth had “become more pronounced in the past few years because of the of the rise in assets prices – people that own those assets have seen their wealth go up,” he said.

Source: Inequality increasing, says Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe

I was a poor kid at a wealthy private school. It gave me social mobility, but also a sense of shame | Education | The Guardian

Scholarships at private schools might be highly sought after, but they cause otherwise progressive people to support institutions that maintain structural inequality in society

Source: I was a poor kid at a wealthy private school. It gave me social mobility, but also a sense of shame | Education | The Guardian

The World Bank Report Says Globalization Brings Inequality AnonHQ

The free trade has been beneficial for some countries, but has left developing nations in a perpetual state of struggle. According to Kamal Ahmed, who is a specialist in the field of Economics and a journalist for the BBC, a report published by the World Bank highlighted …

Source: The World Bank Report Says Globalization Brings Inequality AnonHQ

Yes, Israel does differentiate between Jewish and Palestinian terror | +972 Magazine

When Palestinians demand their attackers receive the same punishments as those who target Jews, the pretense of equal treatment before the law slips away. Some of Israel’s most hardline politicians are fond of saying that they don’t differentiate between terror attacks perpetrated by Jews and Palestinians. In the wake of the Duma arson that killed three members of the Dawabsheh family, the likes of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Miri Regev, Ayelet Shaked and Naftali Bennett were all heard singing variations on the theme of “terror is terror, no matter whether Jewish or Arab.” [tmwinpost] The Israeli state and its judges, however, continue…

Source: Yes, Israel does differentiate between Jewish and Palestinian terror | +972 Magazine

Rishi Khandelwal avoids jail after filing hundreds of fake tax returns – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

A man who filed hundreds of fake tax returns in the names of international students to claim money from the tax office will serve his sentence under an intensive corrections order.

Source: Rishi Khandelwal avoids jail after filing hundreds of fake tax returns – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Our shameful response to the Mt Druitt handcuffing video.

A video of an Aboriginal child being detained by police can never be viewed free of its historical context.

A video of an Aboriginal child’s early interaction with the justice system should never have been used to confect outrage with no regard for his welfare.

Source: Our shameful response to the Mt Druitt handcuffing video – The Drum (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Aboriginal kids die from poverty diseases | SBS News

Health authorities in NSW must do more to protect Aboriginal children in remote communities from “diseases of poverty”, a coroner has warned. Kia Shillingsworth was four when she was rushed to Brewarrina Hospital in the NSW far northwest on October 29, 2012. Kia had been active that morning but by the afternoon was coughing, wheezing, lethargic and running a temperature. By 9pm, Kia was coughing blood and specialist crews were rushed to her hospital bedside by midnight. She was pronounced dead around 2am.

Source: Aboriginal kids die from poverty diseases | SBS News

Robert Reich’s Documentary ” Inequality for All”

ROBERT B. REICH, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies, was Secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration. Time Magazine named him one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the twentieth century. He has written thirteen books, including the best sellers “Aftershock” and “The Work of Nations.” His latest, “Beyond Outrage,” is now out in paperback. He is also a founding editor of the American Prospect magazine and chairman of Common Cause. His new film, “Inequality for All,” is now available on Netflix, iTunes, DVD, and On Demand.

Australia was noted in the 60’s for it’s equality. A classless society one proud of the “fair go” offered to each of us. That’s changed and this government is determined to widen the gap.

14 October 2014, 6.19am AEDT

Do Australians still believe in the fair go? Views on pay suggest not

 Which country favours the biggest pay gap?

The United States was not the country in which people saw the largest gap between CEO and worker as ideal. The identity of that country might come as a surprise.

It was not Germany or Japan or France. It was Australia. We thought the ideal ratio of CEO pay to worker pay would be 8.3.

Not only did Australians approve of the largest gap between CEO and worker, we did so by a fair margin. Here, in order, are the countries seeing the largest pay gaps as ideal:

Kiatpongsan and Norton/Harvard Business School, Chulalongkorn University

The “gap” between Australia at 8.3 and the second place-getter – the US – is 1.6. This is more than twice the “gap” (0.7) between the US and fifth-placed Japan.

By a significant margin Australians are, it seems, most accepting of a large pay gap between those at the top and those at the bottom. This is certainly very different from the image of Australia as a highly egalitarian country.

In The Lucky Country (published in 1964), Donald Horne described Australia as “the most egalitarian of countries” where “most people earn within a few pounds of the average”. Although Horne acknowledged there were still some forms of inequality, he expressed the belief these would fade with time. For Horne, Australia was above all a place that valued egalitarianism.

What’s become of our fabled egalitarianism?

Now, 50 years later, we are the country (at least of those surveyed) most accepting of big differences in pay between those at the bottom and those at the top. What has happened? Is it possible that in the last half-century we have in our values gone from being “the most egalitarian of countries” to the least, or one of the least, egalitarian?A few possible answers to these questions might be considered

So it remains unclear why Australians are accepting of such large pay differences between those at the top and the rest. Is it possible we just no longer believe in the fair go? Let alone know the reality of those differences and how incorrect those beliefs are.