Tag: Culture

The abuse and hate I get when I speak out hurts – but shutting up isn’t an option | Mehreen Faruqi | Opinion | The Guardian

Dr Mehreen Faruqi makes her first speech in the Senate

But when I meet people in the community, particularly young women of colour, who tell me they couldn’t consider a career in public life because they see the abuse that this would open them up to, I know shutting up isn’t an option. Our parliaments already lack the gender and cultural diversity of our streets and suburbs. Giving in to the abusers will only make it worse.

via The abuse and hate I get when I speak out hurts – but shutting up isn’t an option | Mehreen Faruqi | Opinion | The Guardian

‘Kill myself or leave’: female surgeons reveal horrifying conditions

This must be the Liberal Party declaring it’s the way it’s always been done therefore the best way. She’s just the Julia Banks of surgery. (ODT)

Some surgeons claim the problem is the “feminisation” of the specialty and believe the new generation of surgeons should “man-up” as previous generations have done.

Bullying, sexual abuse, extreme work hours and fatigue were key reasons women gave up their life-long ambitions of becoming surgeons, an Australian and UK study published on Friday has found.

Women make up roughly 60 per cent of medical students in Australia and New Zealand, yet just 11 per cent of consultant surgeons are female. Women are also leaving mid-surgical training in greater numbers than men, despite evidence that they may be more able applicants.

Kadota, 31, resigned from her unaccredited registrar position at Bankstown Hospital’s plastic and reconstructive surgery department after being made to work up to 24 consecutive days on-call.

She was dismissed as an “emotional female” and her pleas for support were ignored. Kadota crashed her car at the end of her last shift and was hospitalised for six weeks for sleep deprivation.

via ‘Kill myself or leave’: female surgeons reveal horrifying conditions

Racism, citizenship and schooling: why we still have some way to go

Racism means people experience citizenship differently. It means opportunities and capacities are not equally available to every citizen and egalitarian justice, the idea of a “fair go” for everyone, doesn’t work as it’s intended.

Racism divides societies and fractures the idea of common nationhood. It helps explain why some people don’t get a fair go at school, for example.

via Racism, citizenship and schooling: why we still have some way to go

Cocaine, girls, million-dollar fraud: What the Commonwealth Bank lender did next

A Commonwealth Bank loans officer who perpetrated a $3.5 million fraud on the bank and spent up big on cocaine, “lots of girls” and fine dining, was never reported to police, allowing him to continue working in the financial services sector.

via Cocaine, girls, million-dollar fraud: What the Commonwealth Bank lender did next

Revelations from Bill O’Reilly’s settlements underscore how Fox News enables its sexual harassers

But O’Reilly did not act alone; he was enabled by Fox News, which has a long history of protecting sexual harassers and abusers and which has a culture described by one former employee as a “sex-fueled, Playboy mansion-like cult steeped in intimidation, indecency, and misogyny.” And, according to the Times, when one of O’Reilly’s accusers filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against him, “Fox News and Mr. O’Reilly adopted an aggressive strategy that served as a stark warning of what could happen to women if they came forward with complaints. … Before [former Fox producer Andrea] Mackris even filed suit, Fox News and Mr. O’Reilly surprised her with a pre-emptive suit of their own.”

Revelations from Bill O’Reilly’s settlements underscore how Fox News enables its sexual harassers

‘The Arena Was Almost Empty’: Baltimore Reporter Goes To Bill O’Reilly Show And Finds Only 20% Of Seats Full | Crooks and Liars

During a panel discussion about O’Reilly’s reported $32 million sexual harassment lawsuit, Zurawik reflected on the fact that Fox News chose to renew the host’s contract even though executives were aware of the litigation.

“This speaks to the larger question of Fox News,” Zurawik said. “This doesn’t change Fox News. Twenty years of a culture that Roger Ailes established and that continued takes more than firing just the head of it. And now we see how deep-seated it is.”

Source: ‘The Arena Was Almost Empty’: Baltimore Reporter Goes To Bill O’Reilly Show And Finds Only 20% Of Seats Full | Crooks and Liars

There is no Aboriginal disadvantage. Our culture is our advantage, and all Australians can share it | Opinion | The Guardian

Sharing Indigenous culture without being worthy or gloomy is easy. Our resilience, our harmony with country and the joy of the corroboree can heal wounds

Source: There is no Aboriginal disadvantage. Our culture is our advantage, and all Australians can share it | Opinion | The Guardian

Gun nation: a journey to the heart of America’s gun culture – video | World news | The Guardian

A revealing and unsettling journey to the heart of America’s deadly love affair with the gun

Source: Gun nation: a journey to the heart of America’s gun culture – video | World news | The Guardian

Why The Murdochs Have To Clean House At Fox News

Butts being grabbed, women being kissed against their will, female employees being ogled at work, promotions being offered in exchange for sex, and the looming threat of being fired for anyone who complained about the degrading harassment.Is it just me, or does the recent ugly portrait of Fox News these days in the wake of Roger Ailes’ de

Source: Why The Murdochs Have To Clean House At Fox News

Report: Sexual Harassment At Fox News Goes Way Beyond Roger Ailes

Following the ousting of former Fox CEO Roger Ailes amid allegations that he sexually harassed former network anchor Gretchen Carlson, The New York Times reported that a culture of sexual harassment and intimidation in Fox News may extend beyond Ailes. According to the Times, interviews with current and former Fox News employees revealed “instanc

Source: Report: Sexual Harassment At Fox News Goes Way Beyond Roger Ailes

Black culture isn’t the problem – systemic inequality is | Boots Riley | Opinion | The Guardian

Bill Clinton isn’t the first person to blame ‘black-on-black crime’ for higher poverty and prison rates among black Americans

Source: Black culture isn’t the problem – systemic inequality is | Boots Riley | Opinion | The Guardian

Aussie politicians return Rolexes gifted by Chinese businessman after discovering they’re NOT fake: Shanghaiist

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In a bizarre case of trolling, instant noodle producer and Guancheng

Source: Aussie politicians return Rolexes gifted by Chinese businessman after discovering they’re NOT fake: Shanghaiist

How Right-Wing Media Talk About Poverty In America:From “Richness Of Spirit” To Food Stamps As A Diet Plan, 5 Ways Conservatives Are Wrong About The Poor

Right-wing media have a plan to solve the national crisis of poverty in America — and it’s all about “personal responsibility.”

Roughly 45 million Americans live in poverty, 1 in 7 received food stamps just last year, and 20 percent of children under the age of 18 were impoverished in 2013. Politicians and media figures have offered many possible solutions to help low-income Americans break free from this systemic cycle of inequality, including expanding the social safety net and educational opportunities for all.

But over the years, conservative media have offered their own strategies. Watch as Media Matters looks back at the five easy steps they’ve proposed to help Americans living paycheck to paycheck find that “richness of spirit”:

Jihadis Deface and Destroy Iraqi Cultural Artifacts (Video): Invading armies loot and ransack: The US did it for profit when they could. The Taliban did it. The treasures unashamedly sold to the museums of the world.

http://bcove.me/maob26q1

Reports this week that Mosul’s central library has been ransacked by Isis and 100,000 books and manuscripts burned has cast an international spotlight on a new wave of destruction that has been raging through the northern Iraqi city since last summer.

Earlier this month the head of the UN’s Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) voiced alarm over “one of the most devastating acts of destruction of library collections in human history.” Director general Irina Bokova said the destruction involved museums, libraries and universities across Mosul.

She added: “This destruction marks a new phase in the cultural cleansing perpetrated in regions controlled by armed extremists in Iraq. It adds to the systematic destruction of heritage and the persecution of minorities that seeks to wipe out the cultural diversity that is the soul of the Iraqi people.”

On Monday, Ninwa Al Ghad, a satellite channel broadcasting out of Mosul, reported that the central library had been burned with the reported loss of Iraqi newspapers from the beginning of the 20th century, as well as maps, books and collections from the Ottoman period. But confusion remains about the extent of the damage, with two local Facebook groups insisting on Thursday that, though some books were burned, the library itself was still standing.

The escalating devastation culminated on Thursday with the release of a five-minute video purportedly showing militants using sledgehammers to smash ancient artifacts in the city. The video, posted on Twitter and bearing the logo of Isis’s media arm, shows a group of bearded men in a museum using hammers and drills to destroy several large statues, including one depicting a winged-bull Assyrian protective deity that dates back to the 9th century BC.

The news saddens but does not surprise Shahla Kamal, who until last summer was a lecturer at Mosul University’s College of Political Science. In June she was overseeing students sitting an end-of-year exam when the dean told everyone to go home because of an immediate curfew.

Overnight, the Islamic State had taken over the city and imposed sharia laws. Shahla lost her job when Isis deemed the college “un-Islamic” and closed it along with the colleges of law, fine arts, physical education, languages, social sciences and archaeology.
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Isis looted and vandalised the new multimillion-dollar physics and chemistry laboratories. Each college had its own library and these were looted, too. Some, like the library of Islamic studies, housed priceless ancient manuscripts. Not any more. The classrooms of the closed colleges and departments are now the sleeping quarters for Isis fighters, and are used as storage for their weapons cache.

In addition to the college libraries, each of Mosul University’s two campuses has a central library. Teba used to work in one of them, and visits whenever she can. The library is still intact, but Teba makes sure that squatters – who have now moved on to the campus with their farm animals – don’t use the books and furniture for firewood. She says she’s heartbroken and enraged at the fate of Mosul’s central library, and fears a similar fate for the remaining university libraries.

Mustafa was unable to salvage anything from the College of Physical Education, where he worked. The last time he went there to check on the college he was stunned to find the college’s Olympic-sized pool looking like a green swamp, and Isis fighters lounging on the furniture, their sleeping mattresses stacked up outside the dean’s office. “The Amir [Al Baghdadi] takes what the Amir wants,” the fighters said, and demanded that he hand over his keys to the department.

The college of economics and business where Soraya studied was not closed. Isis did make a number of changes, such as segregating students by gender and driving away almost all the female staff. In November 2014, Soraya quit her studies after a female Isis police officer threatened to bite her hand for taking off her regulation gloves during an exam – with the gloves on, Soraya’s pen kept slipping while she tried to write. Biting is common – one of Soraya’s friends needed three stitches on her right hand when she was bitten – and students say Isis’s female police wear a steel fitting in their mouths with jagged fangs to make their bite particularly sharp. Soraya decided at that moment to leave college and stay inside her house where she can wear anything she wants.

My family swap these stories of relatives and friends and shake our heads in disbelief. This is not the Mosul University they helped create half a century ago. In 1964, my great grandfather Abdul Fattah Al Malah, a graduate of the American University in Beirut and Oxford University, established the College of Pharmacy at Mosul University. He, and the other founders of Mosul University, all western-educated, brought a cadre of academics from Europe, the United States, India, Pakistan and several Arab countries to teach alongside Iraqi academics. That same multinational cadre went on to teach my parents who both went to study there in the 1970s.

As a child, my favourite pastime was to listen to my great grandfather reading stories to me and my cousins. Each was about the life of a groundbreaking scholar or scientist. “Education, education, education,” he would say to me, shaking his index finger like he was delivering a threat. He passed away in 1996. As much as I miss him, I am glad he is not alive to see Mosul today.