Tag: NZ

‘Snap back’? Jacinda Ardern snaps forward with a four day week: no wonder she’s popular | Van Badham | Opinion | The Guardian

Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern speaks at a COVID-19 press conference at the Beehive Theatrette, Parliament on May 20, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.

Among a claque of western leaders yearning for “snap back” to the way things were before the virus – some pursuing “recovery” strategies of even lesser benefit – it’s New Zealand’s, conspicuously, who repeatedly shows the courage to snap forward. Little wonder she has become so popular.

via ‘Snap back’? Jacinda Ardern snaps forward with a four day week: no wonder she’s popular | Van Badham | Opinion | The Guardian

The battle over how to fight coronavirus has a fault line — and this week it deepened – Analysis & Opinion – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

A composite image of Scott Morrison and Jacinda Ardern

via The battle over how to fight coronavirus has a fault line — and this week it deepened – Analysis & Opinion – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

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Old Dog Thoughts- 21/3/20 Leaders of the Free World

https://cdn.iflscience.com/images/9cc0cf38-a00f-5c8f-b46b-8f1c9914491c/extra_large-1584373010-cover-image.jpgImage may contain: 4 people, text

Fighting Fake News with REAL,21/3/20; Australian individuals are asked to cough up again like the GFC and not just into their arms; The IPA really do magnify why Capitalism hasn’t a clue on how to deal with Covid-19;

Today, Aotearoa New Zealand stands with Behrouz Boochani as a counterpoint to the politics of hate | Golriz Ghahraman | World news | The Guardian

New Zealand Greens MP Golriz Ghahraman with former Manus Island detainee Behrouz Boochani in Christchurch.

via Today, Aotearoa New Zealand stands with Behrouz Boochani as a counterpoint to the politics of hate | Golriz Ghahraman | World news | The Guardian

Firearms are used to Murder 11,000 /yr in US; N. Zealand Banned Semi-Automatic Guns after 50 Killed

https://www.juancole.com/images/2019/06/firearms-kill-11000-yr-in-us-n-z.jpg

The US gun industry is a $28 billion a year business.In comparison, the whole US film industry has only $42 billion in annual revenues.Most congressmen can be bought for a few thousand dollars, and the corrupt American political system allows them to be so bought. That is the difference between New Zealand and the US. New Zealand’s political system may have its problems, but most politicians who behaved there as they do in the US would go to jail for taking bribes. As Taito Phillip Field.

via Firearms are used to Murder 11,000 /yr in US; N. Zealand Banned Semi-Automatic Guns after 50 Killed

NRATV’s Grant Stinchfield: New Zealand is “the equivalent of a dictatorship” and “what tyranny looks like” after proposed assault weapons ban

In the USA the anarchy of free-speech has destroyed reasoned debate and replaced it with misinformation to maintain division in an apparent transparency only. Those with the bullhorn in hand are now trying to lessen the laws of surveillance only of the 1%. Enhancing the state of secrecy. Trump news WSJ and Breitbart have the bullhorn. Guess AUS is dictatorship too.(ODT)

via NRATV’s Grant Stinchfield: New Zealand is “the equivalent of a dictatorship” and “what tyranny looks like” after proposed assault weapons ban

White supremacy is on the march, and Trump is at least partly to blame | Moustafa Bayoumi | Opinion | The Guardian

‘The president – any president – sets the national tone for what is permissible speech and impermissible speech in the political arena. Donald Trump, on the other hand, merely revels in the impermissible.’

After the Christchurch shooting by a racist gunman the president played down the threat of white nationalism but his record speaks louder than words

via White supremacy is on the march, and Trump is at least partly to blame | Moustafa Bayoumi | Opinion | The Guardian

Right Wingers Flail About Trying To Blame Democrats For New Zealand Shooting | Crooks and Liars

Right Wingers Flail About Trying To Blame Democrats For New Zealand Shooting

 

What is the best way shallow thinkers and Right-Wing Nut Jobs can deflect blame for the awful things their words and deeds have wrought? Why, blame the Left, of course! We’re so awful, just trying to distribute power and wealth more evenly and fairly in our society, and all.

via Right Wingers Flail About Trying To Blame Democrats For New Zealand Shooting | Crooks and Liars

New Zealand: Is Trumpism now replacing ISIL as a major Cause of Stochastic Terrorism?

Thursday’s bloody massacre of peaceful Muslim worshipers at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, appears as I write to be the be work of an expatriate Australian cell of white supremacists who wrote on the internet their admiration of Donald Trump. In his manifesto, the alleged ringleader called Trump the “symbol of renewed white identity.”

But this phenomenon of white nationalists inspired to violence by Trump is hardly new or unusual. The Charlottesville white terrorist who killed Heather Heyer, and his colleagues among Neo-Nazis who chanted “Jews will not replace us,” were in part celebrating that Trump had come to power. He declined to condemn them, insisting that there were very fine people “on both sides.” One side was Nazis.

The 2018 white terrorist who shot up a mosque in Quebec City spent the hours before his murders scouring the internet for Trump quotes and was obsessed by an imagined threat from immigrants.

After 9/11, America’s challenge was al-Qaeda-style asymmetric terrorism. Today, almost all terrorism in the United States has a white nationalist character, and the person promoting stochastic terrorism by the Far Right is the president of the United States.

via New Zealand: Is Trumpism now replacing ISIL as a major Cause of Stochastic Terrorism?

Israel warned New Zealand that UN resolution was ‘declaration of war’: report

Israeli leader personally phoned New Zealand’s foreign minister to warn him that Wellington’s co-sponsorship of a UN resolution was a “declaration of war”.

Source: Israel warned New Zealand that UN resolution was ‘declaration of war’: report

Let’s learn from the mistakes that created US poverty, not copy them | Van Badham | Opinion | The Guardian

While I’ve been in the US this year, the issue of food insecurity has become a pressing issue. We can’t let Malcolm Turnbull lead us down that path

Source: Let’s learn from the mistakes that created US poverty, not copy them | Van Badham | Opinion | The Guardian

Brexit could mean VISA-FREE migration between Australia, UK, Canada and NZ | World | News | Daily Express

A PROPOSED free mobility labour zone between Australia, New Zealand, the UK and Canada has strong support, according to a poll.

Source: Brexit could mean VISA-FREE migration between Australia, UK, Canada and NZ | World | News | Daily Express

The Ditch between Australia and New Zealand widens as deportations climb – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Dylan Fraser has lived in Australia for 17 years but after spending two years in prison, was deported to New Zealand, away from his family and friends.

Source: The Ditch between Australia and New Zealand widens as deportations climb – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

One of these men still has a head on his shoulder

Tony Abbott and John Key at Parliament House in Canberra

Politics in a different key

On economic reform and now on national security, New Zealand can see beyond scare campaigns and political opportunities – unlike their cousins across the ditch, writes Barrie Cassidy.

There’s no doubt about the Kiwis. Sometimes – well often in fact – they show a political maturity streets ahead of their cousins across the ditch.

Just this week Prime Minister John Key delivered a speech to the Institute of International Affairs on national security and the IS threat.

In that speech he talked about his obligations to secure the country and to support stability and the rule of the law internationally, and that’s just as you would expect.

But Key – the leader of the conservative National Party – and prime minister since 2008 – spoke at length as well about a longer term strategy; dealing with the root causes of extremism; and that’s something that gets precious little attention from the major parties in Australia.

Key said defeating IS (also known as ISIL) “will mean winning the hearts and minds of those vulnerable to its destructive message.”

“There is little doubt,” he said, “that a lack of movement towards a two-state solution in relation to Palestine, and the recent high number of civilian casualties in Gaza, serve to make the task of recruiters to extremist causes a significantly easier one.

“The unresolved issue of Iran’s nuclear capabilities hangs over the region as well.

“We also need to redouble efforts towards reaching a political solution to the violent stalemate in Syria. This has been another cause of ISIL’s rise, and has seen almost 200,000 killed, and led to more than three million Syrians fleeing their country.”

He went on to say that “the seeds of ISIL’s success lie in the failure of the Maliki regime to adhere to acceptable standards of governance, and to treat all citizens, regardless of ethnicity or religion, with respect.”

Key emphasised that military support is one thing, but the new al-Abadi government will need significant international backing if they are one day to fight their own battles.

In Australia, Tony Abbott talks incessantly about a “death cult”, or if you’d prefer, just this week, “an apocalyptic millennial extremist ideology”, that essentially beheads and crucifies people simply because they don’t like us. He likes to keep it simple. And the Labor opposition too steers away from sophisticated discussion about root causes for fear something they say might be interpreted as a lack of bi-partisanship. That could cost votes.

But then again, New Zealand is the country that introduced a GST at 10 per cent in 1986, increased it to 12.5 per cent in 1989, and then finally to 15 per cent with big personal tax cuts as compensation. And then Key got re-elected. In Australia, a GST was introduced in July 2000, at 10 per cent, and both the base and the rate have stayed the same since.

The debate in New Zealand was not particularly acrimonious and the public broadly, if not grudgingly, embraced each increase. Why? Partly because the politics being played out was not as self serving and destructive as that experienced here whenever the issue is raised. The electorate apparently understood they were not being asked to pay more taxes; but rather to accept a more efficient and sustainable mix of taxation.

On economic reform – and now on national security – they can see the issues beyond scare campaigns and political opportunities. The New Zealanders somehow manage to find a place in the world that is commensurate with their size and influence, and at the same time, retain a strong degree of independence.

And just by the way, the threat of a terrorist attack in New Zealand is officially “possible but not expected