Tag: Domestic Violence

Old Dog Thoughts- Real Domestic Violence looks like this and it’s LNP approved

The Minister for Defence, Linda Reynolds.

Fighting Fake News with Real,9/10/19; Face of real Domestic Violence; Australia lost it’s compassion and humour in 2013; Morrison’s Mate and his behavior;

The church has forgotten an inconvenient truth in its opposition to same-sex marriage

If there is ever a moment in time when a vast spectrum of Australian religious institutions and their lobby groups should shut right up about the protection of children, it is now, in the wake of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Source: The church has forgotten an inconvenient truth in its opposition to same-sex marriage

Explainer: what Islam actually says about domestic violence

Despite this, several recent media reports have sensationalised domestic violence within the Muslim community, and often falsely linked it to Verse 4:34 in the Qur’an.This misunderstanding has not only been perpetuated within the Australian community,

Source: Explainer: what Islam actually says about domestic violence

When It Comes to Orlando Massacre, Domestic Violence is the Red Flag We Aren’t Talking About | Democracy Now!

In a new article for Rolling Stone, journalist Soraya Chemaly writes, “The Washington Post reported Monday that ‘although family members said [Omar] Mateen had expressed anger about homosexuality, the shooter had no record of previous hate crimes.’ But that depends on how you categorize domestic violence.” Mateen’s ex-wife, Sitora Yusufiy, has come forward to describe how Mateen beat her and held her hostage. ThinkProgress reports that between 2009 and 2012, 40 percent of mass shootings started with a shooter targeting his girlfriend, wife or ex-wife. Just this month in California, a UCLA doctoral student gunned down his professor, prompting a lockdown on campus. But first, Mainak Sarkar allegedly killed his estranged wife in Minnesota, climbing through a window to kill her in her home. Last year alone, nearly a third of mass shooting deaths were related in some way to domestic violence. We speak to writer Soraya Chemaly. Her recent article in Rolling Stone is called “In Orlando, as Usual, Domestic Violence was Ignored Red Flag.”

Source: When It Comes to Orlando Massacre, Domestic Violence is the Red Flag We Aren’t Talking About | Democracy Now!

If we continue to stand back in apathy … what else will happen … what further repressive policies will be enacted in our name? Which groups in our society will next be subject to the untender mercies of our apathy, and of the leadership who enacts policy in our name?

Image from facebook.com

Terror Australis: There is a craziness abroad in…

Australia a ‘nation of victims’, deadly Sydney siege unlikely in Texas, says pro-gun senator Leyonhjelm – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

It’s the very reason the US  gun crimes  rate X6  higher than Australia . Why on earth would we want guns more accessible to everybody? Which really means more accessible to men. We are ranked 41 in the world while the US is No 1 are we that ambitious ?

 

Australia a ‘nation of victims’, deadly Sydney siege unlikely in Texas, says pro-gun senator Leyonhjelm – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

Nicole Kidman: Play Your Part to End Violence against Women

Nicole Kidman: Play Your Part to End Violence against Women. 53878.jpeg

50 word blurb: UN Women Goodwill Ambassador and Academy Award-winner Nicole Kidman raises awareness to end violence against women. She urges all members of society to play their part in halting this pandemic that affects one in three women and girls globally.

100 word blurb: UN Women Goodwill Ambassador and Academy Award-winner Nicole Kidman raises awareness to end violence against women. With UN Women, she has travelled to countries, highlighting the challenges and solutions on the ground to end violence against women. She has worked to amplify the voices of women survivors, advocating not only for a stop to the pandemic of violence against women, but also for support services for survivors. Here, she urges members of society to play their part in ending this scourge that affects one in three women and girls globally.

At least one in three women and girls will be subjected to violence and abuse in their lifetimes- that’s more than one billion lives destroyed by trauma and injury.

One in three – that is not a just a horrifying statistic. It means at every moment of every day, there is a woman who is suffering a brutal beating in her home, or a devastating sexual assault. It means that somewhere, a girl will lose her childhood when she is forced to marry before she turns eighteen. A young girl is in excruciating pain as her genitals are mutilated, right this minute, leaving her with a lifetime of physical and mental scars. It can be your friend, your neighbour next door, your co-worker. It can be your family member. Who is next?

One in three. As a mother of three daughters the thought is simply unbearable. It is chilling to realize how dangerous the most ordinary places can be for us women and girls. We could be beaten or raped, while simply taking a stroll in the park or on our way to visit a friend; harassed at school, or while browsing the internet. The threat is always there and most often, violence against women and girls occurs where we should be safest – at school, in our homes, with our partners. 

One in three. It’s an outrage. I am also the mother of a son. I cannot and will not accept that he should have to live in a world with a distorted notion of masculinity. As long as our boys learn that manliness is equated with dominance and violence is acceptable, we are a long way from the foundation of mutual respect and equality that must inform any relationship between girls and boys, women and men. At the heart of this pandemic of violence against women is the deep rooted inequality between the sexes. We need to rethink and reshape what it means to be a boy or a girl, a man or a woman.

As a Goodwill Ambassador for UN Women, I have met with survivors and learned a lot about what works and what’s needed. I know that the law must protect women and girls to ensure their basic human right to a life free of violence and bring abusers to justice.  I have seen the urgent need for services for survivors – for safe houses, medical assistance, counselling and legal advice.

I remember vividly when the Beijing Fourth World Conference on Women happened in 1995. As a young actress, even though far from the action in Beijing, I experienced it as a moment of great hope and aspiration. Countries everywhere in the world committed to gender equality and made ending violence against women a top priority. They agreed that violence is one of the main barriers to equality, because women and girls lose opportunities to learn, work and thrive, when they experience violence. They face life-altering health consequences. The shame and marginalization can shut them away from public life. No area of women and girls’ lives goes entirely untouched by violence or the potential for it.

Since Beijing, a lot has happened. We can look back and see how a powerful momentum to stop all forms of violence against women and girls has gathered. Many more women and girls today are indeed protected by laws and services. Men and boys have joined the effort to end violence and promote equality. But more needs to be done.

It all starts with us, so don’t look away. Don’t stop the conversation.

To me, there is no greater injustice than violence against women and girls. That’s why, as UN Women’s Goodwill Ambassador, I have spoken most on this issue. As an actress and activist, I can raise my voice and help raise awareness. As a neighbour and friend, I can intervene when I see abuse happening. As a mother, I can teach my children to value and respect themselves and others. I can teach them not to condone or accept discrimination and violence against women and girls.  To make violence against women and girls an issue of the past, we have to start with the generations of today and the future.

Starting from 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to 10 December, International Human Rights Day, activists around the world will be taking action, raising their voices against gender-based violence. They will use the colour orange visibly and creatively to make it impossible for anyone to ignore the issue anymore. Take part in it. Orange YOUR neighborhood to raise awareness. Reach out to your neighbours, local stores, schools, libraries and post offices.

Imagine a world free from violence against women and girls. A world where equality and respect and justice are not just ideals, or possible for only a few women and girls, but the norm for all of us.  Each of us has a role to play to make this happen. Play your part.