Tag: Nakba

Nakba: Remembering Israel’s Massacre of Palestinians at Tantura

Palestines Lost Generations. A history untold

On this day in May 1948, up to 200 Palestinians were massacred by Israeli troops in the coastal village of Tantura, located 35 kilometres south of Haifa. It was one of the 64 Palestinian coastal villages on the road between Tel Aviv and Haifa, of which only two remain today, Furaydis and Jisr Al-Zarka. The rest were ethnically cleansed, as were hundreds of other villages, towns and cities elsewhere in occupied Palestine.

Source: Nakba: Remembering Israel’s Massacre of Palestinians at Tantura

Reflections on the 75th Anniversary of a Nakba That Never Ended – scheerpost.com

A girl holds a key symbolizing the homes left by Palestinians in 1948, during a rally along the border east of Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip on May 1, 2023, marking the 75th anniversary of the Nakba. (Said Khatib / AFP via Getty Images)

If you’re driving across the length of our bruised geography, you will drive past women and men who will choose, time and time again, death over indignity. If you slow down to listen to their orations, you will realize, even if for a brief moment, that you would do the same.

Source: Reflections on the 75th Anniversary of a Nakba That Never Ended – scheerpost.com

Apartheid: How a Reluctant UN Official Was convinced to so Describe Israeli Policies toward Palestinians

Apartheid: How a Reluctant UN Official Was convinced to so Describe Israeli Policies toward Palestinians

“We are now in the sixtieth year of the Nakba. There are those who dance now on our graves, and they consider us their feast. But the Nakba is not a memory; it is a continuous uprooting that makes Palestinians more worried about their existence. The Nakba continues because the occupation continues. Continuing occupation means the continuation of the war. This permanent war waged by Israel against us is not a war to defend its existence; it is a war over our existence. The conflict is not, therefore, a conflict between two existences, as the Israeli discourse promotes . . . You are here, dear friends, to see the facts for how they are. Yesterday we celebrated together the end of apartheid in South Africa. And here you see it thriving . . . in all of its power.”

Apartheid: How a Reluctant UN Official Was convinced to so Describe Israeli Policies toward Palestinians

East Jerusalem Settlement Push Shows Israel “Apartheid”

07 May 2021, Israel, Jerusalem: An Israeli officer confronts a man during a demonstration near the Damascus gate of Jerusalem's old city against the planned eviction process for the Palestinians in the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood. Photo: Ilia Yefimovich/dpa (Photo by Ilia Yefimovich/picture alliance via Getty Images)

“It’s remarkable that a term like Nakba, that discussion of issues like settler colonialism and what Zionism really means are finally entering global, and especially American Western, public discourse.”

Source: East Jerusalem Settlement Push Shows Israel “Apartheid”

PODCAST: The other Palestinian march of return | +972 Magazine

For Palestinian citizens of Israel, the march is an important commemoration of their painful history. It’s a way Palestinians keep the stories of the Nakba alive and pass them on to younger generations. May 9, 2019, Khubbeiza. (Mati Milstein)

Every year for over two decades, thousands of Palestinian citizens of Israel have marked Nakba Day by marching to the site of a different village that was depopulated and destroyed during the Nakba.

While the story of Palestinian refugees — 700,000 of whom were driven out or fled in 1948 — is relatively well known, we rarely speak of those who were internally displaced during the war. These families remained in what became Israel but were never allowed to return to their original homes.

This year, the Return March marking 71 years since the Nakba was held in one such village, Khubbeiza. +972 Magazine’s Henriette Chacar went to the march to hear from participants of various ages what it means to them.

via PODCAST: The other Palestinian march of return | +972 Magazine