Category: Jobs Jobs

Secure Jobs, Better Pay bill: Big business needs to be cured of low wage addiction

For many years now, employees have been told that a real wage rise is imminent.

The results of the collapse of the single employer bargaining system appear on my desk each week. Individual employment contracts prepared by major corporations and their lawyers and signed en masse by their employees. There is no bargaining, no negotiation. And unless you’re Alan Joyce or another CEO represented by the Business Council of Australia, no real wage increase

. And as we now recognise, the collapse of single employer bargaining and the ascendancy of employment contracts has produced a decade of wage stagnation. Absent a functional collective bargaining system, the labour market reverts to no bargaining and no real wage increases.

Source: Secure Jobs, Better Pay bill: Big business needs to be cured of low wage addiction

As the jobs summit talks skills – we predict which occupations will have shortages and surpluses in the next 2 years

As the jobs summit talks skills – we predict which occupations will have shortages and surpluses in the next 2 years

3 Suggestions

  • encourage and enable people to qualify quickly and cheaply for occupations where supply is not keeping up – in particular, personal carers, education aides and the construction-related occupations. This may require more places to be offered in existing courses at TAFEs or other vocational education providers, and it may require design of new, shorter qualifications. Fees for these qualifications should be reduced or removed altogether
  • offer more domestic bachelor degree places for students to study nursing and midwifery. These students may be diverted from other bachelor degree courses. These courses necessarily take time to complete, so including nurses in our migration intake will also need to play a role
  • allow wages to climb in low-skilled, less fulfilling jobs such as checkout operators and sales assistants, until such time as automation becomes worthwhile. After that, people who would have been doing these jobs can instead address shortages in hospitality, which is more difficult to automate, or undertake a small amount of training to qualify as personal carers and assistants or education aides.
As the jobs summit talks skills – we predict which occupations will have shortages and surpluses in the next 2 years

More than 17,000 jobs lost at Australian universities during Covid pandemic | Australian universities | The Guardian

File photo of a student walking past buildings at the University of Sydney

Further cuts are likely this year as the border remains closed to international students, Universities Australia says

More than 17,000 jobs lost at Australian universities during Covid pandemic | Australian universities | The Guardian

Let’s put the hype aside, jobs growth shifts from extraordinary to ordinary

But while we’re deflating the government’s triumphalism, its critics also need taking down a peg. They like to remind us that the official unemployment rate understates the true extent of worklessness. Specifically, it fails to take account of under-employment – people with part-time jobs who’d like to work more hours.

All that’s true. But when you correct the unemployment rate (for May) of 5.4 per cent by adding the underemployment rate of 8.5 per cent to give a broader measure of labour “underutilisation” of 13.9 per cent (as, admittedly, the bureau encourages you to do), you’ve gone from understating the problem to overstating it.

via Let’s put the hype aside, jobs growth shifts from extraordinary to ordinary

Unskilled and unable: Why Donald Trump’s great jobs promise is a lie

For all the turmoil marking the first weeks of President Trump, the big boot is yet to drop. That’s when the angry heartland realises the factory jobs aren’t coming back, whatever Trump promised.

Source: Unskilled and unable: Why Donald Trump’s great jobs promise is a lie

Choice consumer survey points to economic ‘pessimism’ as a third of Australians rate the economy ‘poor’

Australian money

New data points to falling consumer confidence in the Australian economy, with almost a third of Australians rating it as poor, up from 25 per cent in September.

The quarterly Choice Consumer Pulse Report comes on the back of last week’s Westpac-Melbourne Institute survey of consumer sentiment, which put consumer confidence at a three-year low, with unemployment also rising slightly.

The Government is poised to release its Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) on Monday.

The Choice survey of more than 1,000 Australians shows electricity remains the top household cost of living concern, followed by the cost of food, groceries and fuel.

“What’s concerning about these figures is they come on the back of declining business confidence and declining consumer confidence figures,” Choice chief executive Alan Kirkland told the ABC.

“We’re seeing a really consistent picture of pessimism about the state of the economy but also what people’s expenditure patterns are likely to be and that’s heading into a peak period.

“So that’s got to be of concern to the retail sector.”

The survey shows 71 per cent of Australians cut spending on entertainment in the past 12 months, while 67 per cent had cut spending on clothing.

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Cuts to spending on holidays increased from 58 per cent to 66 per cent, while anxiety over university of fees was at 87 per cent.

“I think what we’re seeing is that consumer sentiment at the moment is extremely reactive to what’s happening in the broader debate,” Mr Kirkland said.

“So when we see debate in Parliament about spending cuts that raises consumer concern and when we see broader economic debate about concern about unemployment and income, that has an impact on the way people perceive the economy is likely to perform in the next little while.”

Last week, Westpac was describing a sharp deterioration in consumer confidence this month as “disturbing”.

The Westpac-Melbourne Institute Index fell 5.7 per cent in December to a level of 91.1.

Recent Australian Bureau of Statistics gross domestic product data showed the economy expanded just 0.3 per cent in the September quarter and only 2.7 per cent over the year to September 30.