Category: Liberal Arts

The ‘greatest film of all time’: Chantal Akerman’s win shows a generational shift is taking place among critics and filmmakers

What’s your list?

Every decade, the British Film Institute releases their 100 greatest films of all time. Here’s who made the cut.

Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles – Chantal Akerman’s 1975 hypnotic study of a mother performing domestic chores in microscopic detail – has just been crowned the “greatest film of all time” in Sight and Sound’s prestigious poll.

It is only the fourth film to have topped the list since polling began, and the first directed by a woman.

The full list of 100 films was published today, with the top ten:

  1. Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (Chantal Akerman, 1975)
  2. Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
  3. Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)
  4. Tokyo Story (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953)
  5. In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-wai, 2000)
  6. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
  7. Beau Travail (Claire Denis, 1999)
  8. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)
  9. Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
  10. Singin’ in the Rain (Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly, 1952)

If you are looking for a crash-course in film history, this is not a bad place to start.

Source: The ‘greatest film of all time’: Chantal Akerman’s win shows a generational shift is taking place among critics and filmmakers

Government must support artists to enrich Australian cultural life

Income support payments are crucial to a healthy arts sector, writes Leya Reid.

THE NATIONAL Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA) fears that thousands of visual artists and arts workers will be at risk of losing income support payments under the new points-based system for job seekers starting on 1 July 2022.

Government must support artists to enrich Australian cultural life

TV networks join Netflix crusade against Australian arts and screen content – Michael West

Netflix, local content

The TV networks have joined Netflix to oppose local TV content quotas. It’s too expensive, they say. Yet the local arts and screen sector says the industry which employs 200,000 Australians would be devastated. Elizabeth Minter reports on a crucial decision for Communications Minister Paul Fletcher.

Source: TV networks join Netflix crusade against Australian arts and screen content – Michael West

Depression, poverty and bad teeth: performers really do suffer for art

At 56, Pigot recognises the truth of a new report, Falling Through The Gaps: Our Artists’ Health And Welfare, that finds aging Australian performers are facing increasing poverty, homelessness, poor health and depression, with attempted suicide rates more than twice that of the general population.
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via Depression, poverty and bad teeth: performers really do suffer for art

Meryl Streep calls out Trump: Having Bully-in-Chief Coarsens whole Culture | Informed Comment

By Juan Cole | (Informed Comment) | – – Occasionally entertainment and politics intersect, often hitting a false note. You …

Source: Meryl Streep calls out Trump: Having Bully-in-Chief Coarsens whole Culture | Informed Comment

Why Christopher Pyne’s Bill should be knocked back.

Tertiary education is risk it’s imagination it’s not a guarantee of a meal ticket. The Abbott approach to education guarantees debt but no job. The Liberal Arts are a risk driven by passion and need to be encouraged the drive us forward with their imagination. Those taking up the Liberal Arts  often never go on to be financially successful however currently they still have a facility in which to pursue their passion. Turning universities into a product market place will ensure only one thing debt. It wont ensure the availability of the courses or the students because of the increased financial burden.

In a world where who you know more than what you know still predicates professional success. Christopher Pyne is telling pork pies when he claims he is opening a doorway to meritocracy. Sure times have changed but not as much as you think. Reducing tertiary education to system based courses will kill the encouragement of imagination and the investment in  youth that drives us foward.

Science Fiction Writer Ursula K. Le Guin Movingly Warns Against the Dangers of Capitalism (Video)

“I think hard times are coming when we will be wanting the voices of writers who can see alternatives to how we live now and can see through our fear-stricken society and its obsessive technologies to other ways of being, and even imagine some real grounds for hope,” said Ursula K. Le Guin as she accepted the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters at the 65th annual National Book Awards ceremony.

The fantasy and science fiction author “stole the show” Wednesday as she warned the literary crowd against the dangers of capitalism, which has turned writers into producers of market commodities rather than creators of art.

“We will need writers,” Le Guin continued, “who can remember freedom. Poets, visionaries—the realists of a larger reality.”

When her short speech was loudly applauded, the bespectacled writer thanked her audience, calling them “brave,” ostensibly for cheering her on in her scathing criticism of the publishing world despite the fact that the literary business constitutes the livelihood of many of those present at the ceremony.

And while the entire speech is well worth watching, the most poignant lines Le Guin spoke are the following: “We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings. Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often begin in art, and very often in our art—the art of words.”

During the hard times we are facing and throughout those that the author herself foresees, let us never forget Le Guin for her passion, her art, her words and, perhaps most importantly, her truths.