How a Sri Lankan student’s arrest on terror charges exposes a system built to suspect minorities

Nizamdeen was not released because he was proven innocent. He was released because the system could not prove him guilty. This is the logic of how counter-terrorism policing and the law works against Muslims and people of colour who are policed as suspect communities.

Nizamdeen was charged with making a document connected to the preparation of a terrorist act. The sole piece of evidence was a notebook found in his workplace desk at the University of New South Wales. Despite denying the handwriting in the notebook was his, and the fact Nizamdeen had not used the office space for a month, he was arrested, deprived of access to a lawyer for six days and denied communication with his family for a month.

He was also classified as an “AA extreme high risk restricted” inmate, the highest classification under NSW’s corrective services system.

Mick Sheehy, NSW police’s detective acting superintendent, told the media that Nizamdeen had “affiliated” with ISIS, but less than two months later, the charges were dropped.
Mohamed Kamer Nizamdeen has called the AFP investigation ‘irresponsible’ and ‘biased’. LinkedIn
How ‘extremist identities’ become motive

 

via How a Sri Lankan student’s arrest on terror charges exposes a system built to suspect minorities

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