Alt-right infiltrators find soft targets in Australia’s moribund political parties | Jason Wilson | Opinion | The Guardian

A security camera is seen outside Parliament House in Canberra, Feb. 16, 2015.

We discover the normality of these racist firebrands in our media today in Australia (ODT)

One the one hand, people such as Bowers advocated for an unapologetic embrace of the black-shirt role play that unmistakably marked Charlottesville out as a neo-Nazi gathering; the extremist ideology that underpinned the movement; and also the racist violence that is the only real endpoint of fascist politics.

On the other hand, more strategic or disingenuous white nationalists were urging a path of “normie” dress, less pointed advocacy and quiet entryism into ordinary, conservative politics (their opponents like to refer to them as “optics cucks”).

Those who dismiss the small numbers on the far right rarely consider how small the membership of modern political parties tends to be

On podcasts and social media threads, white nationalists from this latter faction argued that young white nationalists should keep a low profile, stay in school and work, and carry out their political activism within established political institutions.

Alt-right infiltrators find soft targets in Australia’s moribund political parties | Jason Wilson | Opinion | The Guardian

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