Murdoch’s war: How a lovestruck teenager, an angry man and an ambitious baron made sure bad news was no news on the path to Iraq | The Monthly

Yet in no country was Murdoch’s stance on Iraq so influential as in Australia. For in no other country does Murdoch wield even remotely the same media power. Since 1987 Murdoch has owned the most important newspapers in Sydney and Melbourne – The Daily Telegraph and Herald Sun – and the only daily papers in Brisbane, Adelaide, Hobart and Darwin. He owns the sole general national daily, The Australian. His only serious competitor is Fairfax. For this situation, duopoly is too weak a word. Through their editorials, opinion columnists and presentation of the news, Murdoch’s newspapers softened an originally hostile and sceptical public in preparation for Australia’s participation in the invasion of Iraq in March 2003, an invasion many political commentators around the world still regard as unlawful, unprovoked and unnecessary. When the justification for that invasion – Iraq’s supposed possession of an arsenal of weapons of mass destruction – turned out to be totally false, and when Iraq began to fall apart, these same papers helped reconcile public opinion to what the government had done.

Source: Murdoch’s war: How a lovestruck teenager, an angry man and an ambitious baron made sure bad news was no news on the path to Iraq | The Monthly